High Lonesome

 The day before I flew to Portland, I joined Eszter and Elaine for a morning run on the High Lonesome Loop. This popular sixteen-mile loop climbs along the south fork of Boulder Creek, swings around King Lake, makes a quick jump over the Continental Divide and returns via the drainage of Devils Thumb lake. Beat and I have a few friends visiting from California this week while they acclimate for the Hardrock 100, which Beat is also running. I thought I'd be able to coax them out on this loop, but they seem to think work and tapering is more important. So, I'm posting photos in hopes of changing their minds!

 I was intimidated by the prospect of running with these ladies, who are both very fit for this sort of thing. Meanwhile, I'm still battling these breathing issues that don't lend much in the way of predictability. Sometimes I feel great throughout long runs, and sometimes I become overly winded walking up my stairs. For this reason I won't push my own pace — out of concern that too much heavy breathing might invite an asthma attack — and feel self-conscious about trying to keep up with others.

When I apologized about being the caboose of the group, Eszter said, "Don't say sorry." Meaning don't submit to these trite apologies that we (as women) have been conditioned to mumble as a way of minimizing ourselves and others. Instead of saying "I'm sorry for being slow," one should say, "Thanks for waiting up for me. It's great to be out here with you. Morning runs in the high country of the Rockies are amazing!"

 King Lake — looks like a wonderful place for a swim. Really. I won't be able to call myself a Coloradoan until I take a dip in a high alpine lake.


The High Lonesome Trail itself. Following a ribbon of singletrack through a field of wildflowers at 12,000 feet is a wholly intoxicating experience. I'd gotten over all my self-consciousness at this point, and enjoyed the flow.

 That part of the outing where you stop to look out over distant mountains and add another extended entry in an already long list of places to visit someday.

 Elaine and Eszter at the looks-scarier-than-it-was cornice at Devils Thumb Pass. Thanks for the awesome run, ladies. I hope we have a chance to run another high, lonesome ribbon of singletrack together soon.

Comments

  1. You are going to be in such awesome shape for races at sea level.

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  2. I'm sleeping at one of the aid stations at Hard Rock; I'll keep my eyes peeled for Beat!

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    1. Which aid station? I'm going to do some crewing for Beat, so I could say hello.

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  3. Love that loop, although I've always done it in the opposite direction. But honestly, the moderate uphills of the King Lake trail are probably better for running than ascending counter-clockwise. Don't discount your speed, you folks were pretty quick.

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  4. Wow! I want to hike this when we come visit! Unless there is already snow up there. And I can tell you, thanks for waiting for me. It's great to be out here with you!

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    Replies
    1. I'll ask Elaine when snow starts covering the Divide. She's a skier and lives close by, so she would know.

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  5. wow! so beautiful place and its really amazing place for tracking, i also like to travel these kind of places. thanks for sharing https://goo.gl/Ij2IPz

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  6. harry6:58 AM

    great post

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  7. Awesome report and pictures. Looking forward to chatting with you someday soon. Sorry you're having some health issues, but glad you're taking it in stride.

    Scotty Kummer

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