Friday, April 13, 2007

Folk Fest

Yet another setback on the road to recovery. Maybe. The truth is, I've been functioning in this semi-injured state long enough that I don't really remember what normal is supposed to feel like. But I do try to be careful. These days, with summer approaching ever faster, I try to be so, so careful.

Today I had some grocery shopping and other mind-numbing errands to do. Before that, I decided to go for a walk on the beach. You know, slow walk on a flat gravel beach, skimming the surf and picking up seashells like toddlers and little old ladies can do. But the tide was coming up and on my way back, I had to climb up into the rocks to get through. I tentatively chose every step, taking advantage of every handhold and generally following the mantra of three-point contact. However, I was probably just shy of that number when I set my foot down on a slanted boulder and lost contact immediately. I plummeted down the slimy surface in a blinding flash of white pain. It felt like my knee had finally ripped clean from my leg like it's been hinting at all this time. I lay crumpled on the rocks for several seconds, unsure of how to make my next move. If I got up to walk and learned I couldn't, I knew I'd be devastated. And not only that, I'd be stranded alone on a beach with the tide coming up and not a soul knew I was out there. But if I got up and learned I could still walk, I'd have a short hike and a long afternoon full of shame and regret ahead of me. Of all the fun things I could have done to unravel any progress I've made, a toddler walk on the beach would be about my last choice.

After the white streaks stopped shooting across my field of vision and my knee-jerk panic reaction subsided, I accepted the reality that I was OK. I stood up and oozed my way off the rocks at a literal rate of about 100 yards an hour. When I made it back to the safety of smooth gravel, my gait and speed returned fairly quickly back to normal. It seems that all I really did was bend my knee too far when I fell forward, and that pain I felt was just the "10" version of the normal pain I feel in other knee-bending tasks, such as pedaling a bicycle. No new damage, right? Just a little warning from the tender tissue. That's my story. I'm sticking to it.

Well. It seems I've gone off rambling about my knee again. I really intended this post to be about Folk Fest, which is an annual old-timey-and-other-acoustic-music event created to fill out a week of that dull time between winter skiing and summer fishing. Folk Fest is huge here in Juneau. I really had no idea. Half the town packs the city auditorium so tight that there's no room to dance, which is probably a good thing in my case, and countless musicians spill out in the streets, the bars, the motels - anywhere - to start their own renegade sets. We went tonight to see the headliner, the Carolina Chocolate Drops, because we heard they were the real deal. And they were. Alaskans really love their old-timey music, which always struck me as amusing because of our distance - both culturally and geographically - to rural Appalachia. But I am starting to understand the draw. This music will grab you and fling you around in leg-kicking frenzy and spit you out in an idealized world where nothing happened after 1929. I'm not going to pretend I know anything about the culture of old-timey. But I do know that it's a fun escape when it comes through town.

Also, since I'm on the subject of rambling, I wanted to say hello to all of the new people from all over the world who dropped by Thursday (thanks to Blogger for the link love.) More than 5,000. Wow. You may have even read a few posts and are probably wondering why someone would devote an entire blog to a knee injury. But there could be worse blog themes, don't you think? I mean, what's the deal with those people who pretend to have an informative regional blog and then just spend the whole time talking about their hobbies? Pathetic, really, when you think about it.

26 comments:

  1. i wanna visit you one day if it is possible... to have a ride with you... And you can come to Russia as well... Best regards
    Natalia

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  2. Anonymous3:23 AM

    Sweetheart,

    My heart breaks as I read your anguish.

    I can't help you phyically but in mind and spirit remember that you are not alone

    Rest your mind body and spirit.

    Morday
    bd78a@yahoo.com.au

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  3. I stumbled over your blog today and discovered that we must have been twins seperated at birth!

    Obviously, you have a great sense of humor. From your post I gather you have an injured knee ( mine has been operated on twice) and you like old-timey music from the Appalachian Mountains.

    Now, your birth sister here, I live on the outskirts of the Appalachain mountains,(Near Boone, North Carolina) and also love their music. I also have knee problems. My dad lived in Alaska for about six months and I have no desire to go there ( I don't like bears, cold weather, or six months of darkness).

    Another genetic trait we share? We both love to write. I just found out last week that my book will be published soon.

    It was a pleasant surprise to find your blog. Keep up the good work!

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  4. the stark beauty of these photos reminds me of a al pacino movie 'insomnia'. excellent pics by the way.

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  5. Awesome pics! Alaska is one place I have always wanted to visit...I hope I get to do that sooner rather than later. Hope you injuries are healing fast.

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  6. Really nice blog.

    Just love it.

    Keep it running, good luck!

    Alex

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  7. Beauty is always express itself through any .
    Hope you injuries are healing fast.
    http://l0ok.blogspot.com/

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  8. Hi,

    I am Giannis from Athens Greece. I have a cousin from the States that years ago lived in Alaska for almost a year. Here in Greece its quite hot now. I bet you cant ride that good in heat.

    My email is:
    giannis.foufas@gmail.com
    My blog is:
    www.giannisf.blogspot.com

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  9. Thank you for posting these beautiful pictures. No more rock climbing!

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  10. Cool blog like your power of description

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  11. Anonymous7:52 AM

    Please view these clips and videos and check out the website that follows. The following clips prove that a criminal network within our government/private sector was responsible for the collapse of the three World Center buildings on 9/11 and consequently the death of thousands. The only way for us to assure that we do not fall prey to another government-sponsored terror attack is to make the truth behind 9/11 known all throughout the country and recognized all throughout the media. The traitorous perpetrators of 9/11 would be deterred from carrying out another scheme of mass deception for fear that it would trigger the country to revolt against the government, rather than bring the country together like 9/11 did. So please share this with others and press for the truth to be recognized for the sake of our security and sanity.


    -molten steel spewing out the side of tower, which could only be produced by an incendiary device containing an ingredient like thermate/thermite since jet fuel does not burn hot enough (around 800 degrees C) to melt steel (around 1300 degrees C)


    -an example of what thermate/thermite does to steel which is usually used to weld or cut steel


    -firefighters describing molten steel as lava-like at ground zero


    -cleanup team finds hot steel glowing red and orange all over ground zero


    -New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani unwittingly admits on news that he got warning to leave WTC complex that morning because the towers would be coming down despite firemen, fire department, police department, and reporters on scene not knowing


    -Building 7 collapses at nearly free fall speed (about 7 seconds--free fall speed for bldg. that height is about 6 seconds) which defies laws of gravity unless all significant points of structual resistance to the collapse were removed by controlled demolition charges. The reason the towers didn't fall at nearly free fall speed is because their demolition was top-down, not bottom-up like Building 7. Footage of their collapse confirms this.


    -leaseholder of WTC complex accidentally admits on PBS special that they "pulled" Building 7


    -Other segment of same PBS special unwittingly confirms that "pull" is a term used for demolishing a building as a contractor uses the same term to describe demolishing Building 6 weeks after attack. The official explanation for the collapse of Building 7 was that fire and debris damage from the towers weakened the building's structure. The admission that Building 7 was demolished proves that the building's collapse was prepared BEFORE 9/11 since it would have been impossible for a demolition team to place demolition charges all throughout the building in a matter of a few hours, especially in a building with an ongoing fire and damage from debris.


    -BBC reports Building 7 (Salomon Brothers building) has collapsed due to fire damage weakening the building BEFORE it actually collapsed, showing that the perpetrators scripted the collapse for the media by preparing an explanation for the collapse to avoid any unfavorable speculation in the immediate aftermath. As you will see, they got it out too early. (Forward this clip to 14:45 to see the report. The comments added highlight the blunder.)


    -confirmation that the Salomon Brothers building is Building 7


    -emergency workers instructing bystanders to get back because Building 7 is "coming down soon" and is "about to blow up"


    To get a better idea of how all these pieces fit into the puzzle, I recommend watching the two videos below and checking out the online journals below. The videos provide more in-depth explanations and also show how 9/11 was not the only time and place that false-flag terrorist operations have been carried out. The journal shows some of the scientific work that has been done to expose the official story as a fraud.


    documentary on World Trade Center controlled demolition

    documentary on western government terror

    www.scholarsfor911truth.org

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  12. You know you've made it in the bloggy world when you start getting conspiracy theory comment spam. Congrats! :)

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  13. Anonymous9:07 AM

    Hello. I'm from Catalunya, Spain. I have a big interest for Alaska since I watch Nother Exposure.
    I'm going to read you!

    Esther

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  14. My family lives in Juneau, and your great pictures make me feel like I'm there.

    Good luck on your recovery!

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  15. Jill: about your knee (sorry).
    Have you considered getting 150mm
    cranks for your recovery? The last
    time I checked, ebay seemed like a
    reasonable source. Maybe the smaller
    range of motion would make it ok.

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  16. Hi fellow Alaskan! I know all about knee injuries. I had a bad one last year which required stitches.

    Can you believe that I got it from a standing chest?

    Anyway...

    Your site is great, and I'm glad to (briefly) connect with a fellow Alaskan--as you know, are hard to keep up with.

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  17. Hello from Romania, Europe! I like your blog very much.
    Good luck!

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  18. Sorry about the knee.. glad it wasn't as bad as you thought.. looking forward to reading the rest of your archives this weekend:)

    Be careful!
    Greg
    www.denvertvguy.com

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  19. jill...

    you are famous

    to think I can say

    "I electronically knew you when"

    hope the knee heals
    and
    that the blog continues even as the crowds discipate

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  20. Holly Traffic batman!

    Ditto on what gwadzilla posted =)

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  21. Beautiful pics...you are lucky to live in a great part of the world...good luck withthe knee...sounds painful and nasty....see, who said exercise is good for you!!!!! lol

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  22. Hi Jill, the funny thing is while you are seeing your website traffic go up, so am I. And that is because of you.

    I can't tell you how many referrals I've seen today that say they came from your blog. :)

    On a completely different side note though. Being a veteran of 7 knee surgeries over the years I can definitely empathize with you. They are no fun. Just take it slow.

    If there is one thing about knee injuries is they definitely teach you patience because the reality is there is no quick recovery methods for them. Mine gave out on me all the time when I tried to push my boundaries.

    Good luck!

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  23. I am living vicariously through your Alaska photos. Beautiful country! Great blog!

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  24. Anonymous4:11 PM

    I have to say, I feel terrible about your pain and all, but the comment about people who advertise themselves. Hey, I do that too. I hope you won't be so callus as to call me pathetic.

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  25. Nice blog ! It is very interesting to look at those pictures without a need to travel (I would like to but I can't do it now). I am in Quebec, not so far, I think that we have more snow here than there ! : )

    Have a nice day,

    Ricardo

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  26. michelle5:12 PM

    Love your pics, hope to make it to Alaska later this year.

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